Keep talking, I’m still not listening – or why Social CRM becomes relevant today

At the International Forum on Enterprise 2.0 in Milan, Mark Tamis from Net-7 and Esteban Kolsky from ThinkJar talked about “A new era of customer engagement with Social CRM”. Their point of view on this complex matter is the following:

Why is the social customer becoming an important subject these days? Simply because people trust other people – even if they do not know them or only know them from the Internet – more than any company. Instead of watching a company’s ad and then buying the product, potential customers are turning to friends to ask for advice or post a request in some relevant online forum to find out about other people’s experiences. So, instead of seeing the product you want to sell through the eyes of your company, you now have to see it through the eyes of the customer.

Therefore, they say, the new business model is going to be twofold: In addition to focusing on internal Enterprise 2.0 operations, external aspects have to be included as well – namely the social CRM (client facing operations).  Thus, the new business model must be a hybrid of both internal and external communities. This means that employees and customers have to work together very closely in the near future as customers want to become part of the process themselves. So after evolving into a social enterprise, the next step will be a “collaborative enterprise” where there is major interaction with the ecosystem (customers, employees, partners, suppliers, channels).

According to Mark and Esteban, the following things have to be taken into consideration:

  1. Customers are more connected to each other than to the producing company > The company has to become part of the communities to become a trusted entity
  2. Customers follow the direction provided by the social network > Natural effect of herding
  3. Organizations follow the direction provided by the technology > But they should follow the direction provided by their strategy
  4. Convergence of social CRM and E20 occurs in communities > This takes a lot of time!

Of course, this is a very long and time-consuming process. And according to the presenters, a company first needs to be entirely E 2.0, before developing into a collaborative enterprise. Many companies are already at different stages in this process and the crucial point is always the maturity of the company: The change in the mentality is a long way to go.

A more detailed insight on Mark Tamis thoughts is provided by him in his blog.

So much about the presentation in Milan. Social CRM is currently a very trending and highly debated topic among the evangelists. The integration of the customer in the business process is also not a new topic (see the discussions about mass customization). But the integration of socially interacting customers is a new one that is relevant to various fields of business processes such as communications, marketing, sales etc. Each of this disciplines are experimenting in the one or the other way with the social web – a holistic view on this topics must be the end solution but is still far away from yet being realized.

Or do you think differently?


  • enterprise2open

    New blog post: Keep talking, I’m still not listening – or why Social CRM becomes relevant today http://bit.ly/d3cjBM

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • David Hawthorne

    “Oh, enough about me. How do you like my dress?” is a line from an old Yellow Pages commercial based on send-ups of those baffling and ambiguous index headings in the business directory; in this instance: “Vanity Cases”. My point is that business and consumers still talk past one another, interested solely in satisfying their own immediate objective. Every other sound uttered by either of them is just noise.

    It will take at least a a couple of human generations to provide the social conditions for any other “intention” to be successfully encoded. Today we hear that “UK scientists have determined”, definitively, that the “chicken” came before the “egg.” For this, they needed to decode the DNA of egg shells to conclude ‘the first chicken’ then laid the ‘first egg’ (Chicken 1 presumably mutating from some egg-laying dinosaur predecessor).

    Until people being trained in finance and business learn how to value humans as something more than stacks of distributable currencies, the expressions of the consumer will draw only one response: “How would you like to pay for this, credit or debit?” -dh

  • David Hawthorne

    “Oh, enough about me. How do you like my dress?” is a line from an old Yellow Pages commercial based on send-ups of those baffling and ambiguous index headings in the business directory; in this instance: “Vanity Cases”. My point is that business and consumers still talk past one another, interested solely in satisfying their own immediate objective. Every other sound uttered by either of them is just noise.

    It will take at least a a couple of human generations to provide the social conditions for any other “intention” to be successfully encoded. Today we hear that “UK scientists have determined”, definitively, that the “chicken” came before the “egg.” For this, they needed to decode the DNA of egg shells to conclude ‘the first chicken’ then laid the ‘first egg’ (Chicken 1 presumably mutating from some egg-laying dinosaur predecessor).

    Until people being trained in finance and business learn how to value humans as something more than stacks of distributable currencies, the expressions of the consumer will draw only one response: “How would you like to pay for this, credit or debit?” -dh

    This comment was originally posted on Enterprise2Open

  • David Hawthorne

    “Oh, enough about me. How do you like my dress?” is a line from an old Yellow Pages commercial based on send-ups of those baffling and ambiguous index headings in the business directory; in this instance: “Vanity Cases”. My point is that business and consumers still talk past one another, interested solely in satisfying their own immediate objective. Every other sound uttered by either of them is just noise.

    It will take at least a a couple of human generations to provide the social conditions for any other “intention” to be successfully encoded. Today we hear that “UK scientists have determined”, definitively, that the “chicken” came before the “egg.” For this, they needed to decode the DNA of egg shells to conclude ‘the first chicken’ then laid the ‘first egg’ (Chicken 1 presumably mutating from some egg-laying dinosaur predecessor).

    Until people being trained in finance and business learn how to value humans as something more than stacks of distributable currencies, the expressions of the consumer will draw only one response: “How would you like to pay for this, credit or debit?” -dh

  • MarkTamis

    RT @enterprise2open: New blog post: Keep talking, I’m still not listening – or why Social CRM becomes relevant today http://bit.ly/d3cjBM

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • smcmxE20

    Keep talking, I’m still not listening – or why Social CRM becomes relevant today http://bit.ly/a7f3YI

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • ubervu

    RT @smcmxE20 Keep talking, I’m still not listening – or why Social CRM becomes relevant today http://bit.ly/a7f3YI

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter